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I leased an executive demo 2020 q60 rs400 from a friend's wife that works at an infiniti dealership two weeks ago and I've had it in for two alignments since then.

When I got the car it had 6,000 miles but looked almost brand new as expected with a demo. However, this baby keeps drifting to the right on braking and throttle at all different speeds.

The dealer aligned it the first time then cross rotated the wheels the 2nd time and says it's fine but it's still drifting right. They said it was probably the road crowning that prevents road flooding so I drove it on the wrong side of the road in my neighborhood and same issue.

Upon my first detail waxing i have noticed that the front fender under the grill was touched up and sometimes on start up the front emergency sensors light will stay on the dash for a few minutes.

Does it sound like my car might have been in a small accident before leasing it? Any advice? I am thinking of taking it to a 3rd party for a second opinion.
 

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If they've aligned it twice then it should be properly aligned unless their equipment or the tech sucks. Low profile tires with certain tread patterns are subject to tramlining so the road surface often dictates tire direction. Is this unit AWD or RWD? The dealership you used is in what city? Make sure you check COLD tire pressure with an accurate presser gauge. Get out on the open road, engage the cruise control, let go of the wheel on a long straight and see how the car tracks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
If they've aligned it twice then it should be properly aligned unless their equipment or the tech sucks. Low profile tires with certain tread patterns are subject to tramlining so the road surface often dictates tire direction. Is this unit AWD or RWD? The dealership you used is in what city? Make sure you check COLD tire pressure with an accurate presser gauge. Get out on the open road, engage the cruise control, let go of the wheel on a long straight and see how the car tracks.
HI thanks for the reply. It's in Houston TX and it's RWD. Upon exploring the forum it looks like I may have the same issue that a few other members have had.
 

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HI thanks for the reply. It's in Houston TX and it's RWD. Upon exploring the forum it looks like I may have the same issue that a few other members have had.
Then you either had the work done at Southwest or Clear Lake which both have good shops. Mine's RWD and if I let go of the wheel on a straight level road with a good surface the car travels straight as a string. I don't have Direct Adaptive Steering. Now, on a grooved or uneven surface my Q will tramline which is a normal characteristic of low profile high performance tires.

"Tires have the most direct influence on tramlining because they are the part of the vehicle that comes into contact with the road (and the longitudinal ruts and/or grooves that exist there). Unfortunately anything that increases a high performance tire's responsiveness also increases its willingness to tramline.

High performance tires with short sidewalls that develop lots of cornering power at lower slip angles will be more susceptible to tramlining than standard All-Season passenger tires that develop less cornering force until their slip angle increases. A wider treaded tire will encounter more longitudinal ruts and/or grooves in the road than a narrow treaded tire. A tire with large tread blocks that transmits the driver's input to the road with great precision will also transmit the road's imperfections back to the vehicle's suspension. And because tires become more responsive as their tread depth wears away (which is why tires are shaved for competition and track use), a tire will become more likely to tramline as it wears.

Wheels can influence tramlining as well. Installing wider tires or a "Plus Size" tire and wheel package usually requires using wheels with a different offset than the vehicle's original wheels. In some cases, the new wheels will have slightly less offset than the original and in other cases, slightly more. It all depends on the vehicle's suspension design and available wheelwell clearances. You will even find that Original Equipment manufacturers often use different wheel offsets for their different diameter tire and wheel packages."

 
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