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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I just got a new set of tires and wheels a few days ago. The internet tire/wheel outfitter installed new TPMS sensors with the setup and I've been driving the vehicle around for about 100 miles. So far, the vehicle won't recognize the TPMS. I read somewhere that it can take up to a week for the system to sync.

The TPMS light on the dashboard flashes on for 2 seconds on, .5 seconds off. It flashes about 10 times then becomes solid on. When I toggle on the info screen, the individual tire pressures come up blank.

Supposedly, the OEM 40700-3JA0B and VDO Redi Sensor SE55556 TPMS link immediately so I'm assuming they gave me another aftermarket sensor, which they said was 433 mhz.

I took it to my local tire shop and they couldn't get it to work. They said on the 2016-2017 Infiniti Q50/60, I need to take it to the dealership and have them do the relearn/sync through an ODBII port device that Infiniti. Dealership wants to charge me about $25 per tire which I think is a bit steep.

Anybody has any ideas on how I can do this myself?

I have read stuff online on how to find a single wire white plug that is near the ODBII port and touch it to ground 6 times while ignition is on to push into relearn mode, this is after setting each tire to certain different pressures which will force sync. I took a quick look and on my cursory inspection didn't find such a plug.

Also, I have seen TPMS sensor activation tools selling online such as the OEC-T5. I just don't know if this will work for the 2017 Q60.

Anyone have any ideas to help me?
 

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I'd feel fortunate that the dealership was willing to service aftermarket parts, pay the $100 and call it a day.
 
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VDO Redi Sensors did auto connect on my 2017 after a few miles of driving so no programming was necessary at all. You have a few options here. Pay the dealer to read the TPMS IDs of your aftermarket sensors and input them into the vehicle. If you had the TPMS IDs from the tire/wheel vendor and knew which corresponding wheel they were mounted in, you could get the ATEQ Quickset tool and input it into your vehicle yourself. You can also do everything yourself by buying a TPMS tool such as the AUTEL TS401 to read the TPMS IDs and in conjunction with the ATEQ quickset enter them into the vehicle's computer. I have the autel TS401 and the Ateq Quickset and both are good tools. In addition to being able to read the TPMS IDs with the TS401, I used it to clone the IDs of my current sensors onto the AUTEL programmable sensors for use with my winter wheel setup.
 

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If there are any local tire shops around, you could try taking your car into them. A lot of them have the necessary activation tools (although they may need to update them for newer cars sometimes). They should charge less than the dealer (if they do charge). I've had good experiences with local mom & pop type tire shops that have been around longer than I've been around. Most of the time, they patched my tires or worked on my car (small quick things) and have not charged me a dime so you may be similarly lucky.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If there are any local tire shops around, you could try taking your car into them. A lot of them have the necessary activation tools (although they may need to update them for newer cars sometimes). They should charge less than the dealer (if they do charge). I've had good experiences with local mom & pop type tire shops that have been around longer than I've been around. Most of the time, they patched my tires or worked on my car (small quick things) and have not charged me a dime so you may be similarly lucky.
Good advice, what you said is exactly what I ended up doing.

I appreciate the prior post on the equipment to read the TPMS ID frequencies and the second tool to program the car but the cost would be about $300+ for both tools. These tires are going to be my permanent tires with no changes for summer or winter so I didn't really want to purchase the equipment.

I took it to the dealer but they wanted $140 plus tax (not $100 as I was initially quoted). I'm not broke, but I don't like getting ripped off either so I said thanks but no thanks.

I ended up taking it to Discount tire. It literally took him 2 minutes to do it, and he did it for free. He wouldn't even take my tip.

Always a pleasure working them them for all my cars.
 
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