Infiniti Q60 Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are there any long term issues/mechanical problems that may be associated or caused by installing lowering springs onto your stock suspension?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Some people have vibration issues when lowering the AWD versions. Depending on how much lower the springs are compared to stock you also run the risk of blowing the stock shocks prematurely
 
  • Like
Reactions: BRNBOY

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,363 Posts
Depending on how much lower the springs are compared to stock you also run the risk of blowing the stock shocks prematurely.
Yes, see below.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AcerQ17

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,363 Posts
Are there any long term issues/mechanical problems that may be associated or caused by installing lowering springs onto your stock suspension?
Installing lowering springs is no free lunch - it introduces alot of variables:

1) Since you are AWD, lowering the suspension more than 1" can subject the half-shafts (front & rear) to operating at higher angles than they were designed for, and you could end up prematurely wearing out the flex joints (CV joints) located at either end of the half-shafts.

2) If you try dropping 1" or more, then camber, caster(front), and toe will changed, and the stock adjusters for toe (front & rear) and camber (rear) may not be able to bring these measurement back to the acceptable range.

3) The spring rate of the lowering springs is different than the stock springs, because they have to work over a shorter distance. Therefore, the shocks (dampeners) will be worked harder while operating to oppose the higher spring rate, which may end up blowing-out your shocks. Also, since the spring rate of the lowering springs is not match to dampening rate of the shock absorbers, the ride quality will suffer, such as causing the car to pogo down the road.

The better option is a set of coil-overs, which can give you the lower stance, but at least the shock/spring is matched. The change is camber, caster, and toe still applies, however.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BRNBOY

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Installing lowering springs is no free lunch - it introduces alot of variables:

1) Since you are AWD, lowering the suspension more than 1" can subject the half-shafts (front & rear) to operating at higher angles than they were designed for, and you could end up prematurely wearing out the flex joints (CV joints) located at either end of the half-shafts.

2) If you try dropping 1" or more, then camber, caster(front), and toe will changed, and the stock adjusters for toe (front & rear) and camber (rear) may not be able to bring these measurement back to the acceptable range.

3) The spring rate of the lowering springs is different than the stock springs, because they have to work over a shorter distance. Therefore, the shocks (dampeners) will be worked harder while operating to oppose the higher spring rate, which may end up blowing-out your shocks. Also, since the spring rate of the lowering springs is not match to dampening rate of the shock absorbers, the ride quality will suffer, such as causing the car to pogo down the road.

The better option is a set of coil-overs, which can give you the lower stance, but at least the shock/spring is matched. The change is camber, caster, and toe still applies, however.
I appreciate the insight, I will definitely be getting coil-overs instead of the springs then, thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Some people have vibration issues when lowering the AWD versions. Depending on how much lower the springs are compared to stock you also run the risk of blowing the stock shocks prematurely
Oh I see, coil-overs will definitely be the better way to go, appreciate it.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top