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Hi,

So I got my Q60 2017 last November during winter, and since I live in Canada, it's required that we have snow tires.

I had 18"wheels with Michelin X-ice 3 on them.

The car was completely stable, I mean I would remove my hands from the steering wheel on 100KM/H and it wouldn't swerve or change direction. Also, if I steer left or right, the steering wheel would come back automatically to the middle (straight point) easily. I used to take U turns and remove my hands, it would go back fast to the middle straight. COOL!

Now summer is almost here, so I put my 19" alloy wheels last Friday with the original Dunlop 255/40 19.

I found that the car was steering randomly so bad and uncontrollable to a point I was going to do 3 accidents in just 2 hours!

I went to a garage and he found that my tires were completely worn (They truly were..) and I have to change them.

I bought today a set of Michelin Pilot Sport 4S 255/40 19 completely new and had them installed in the garage and we did the alignment and all is good.

However, I still feel a weird feeling with my Q60!

1) On bumpy roads, the steering wheel would go left/right randomly and it becomes worse if I'm speeding! I have to break immediately and try to put the steering wheel to the middle with some force.

2) The steering wheel would go to the right a little bit, but then if I turn it left, it stays left ( doesn't go back in the middle as it used to do with the 18" winter tires ).

3) The car became very light, at least when steering to a point that if I'm speeding and I steer a bit to right or left, I feel that it "GOES" so I have to force straight the steering wheel and you have to be careful ! (Previously if I lift my hands from the steering wheel, it would go back to the middle again - I hope you can imagine what I mean)

4) The previous owner of the car told me that it will become light with the 19" so I think he was experiencing that as well.

Now I'm scared to drive my car even after spending 2k CAD for the new tires, I am scared to speed or break as I always feel the steering wheel goes right and left randomly. When the road is crowded I'm super anxious as I feel that if I blink, it might bump in the car next to me.

Would an extra inch on the wheels + summer tires do all that change? I feel now that I was to put my X-ice again and the smaller rims as I was completely safe using them..

Any ideas?

Picture of my car with the 18" and X-ice
22848
 

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Those wheels are fancy

Noticeable increases in tramlining are frequently uncovered when drivers living in the snowbelt make the seasonal changeover from winter tires to summer tires, or when any driver upgrades the performance of their tires using either the same size or going to a "Plus Size" tire and wheel package. The reason that it becomes more pronounced then is because neither the typically narrower and softer handling winter tires nor the Original Equipment tires generate as much grip or responsiveness as the higher performance summer tires. Since the vehicle's suspension works as a complete package, a higher performance tire will also uncover any previously unnoticed looseness in the rest of the suspension.

Components
Tires have the most direct influence on tramlining because they are the part of the vehicle that comes into contact with the road (and the longitudinal ruts and/or grooves that exist there). Unfortunately anything that increases a high performance tire's responsiveness also increases its willingness to tramline.

High performance tires with short sidewalls that develop lots of cornering power at lower slip angles will be more susceptible to tramlining than standard All-Season passenger tires that develop less cornering force until their slip angle increases. A wider treaded tire will encounter more longitudinal ruts and/or grooves in the road than a narrow treaded tire. A tire with large tread blocks that transmits the driver's input to the road with great precision will also transmit the road's imperfections back to the vehicle's suspension. And because tires become more responsive as their tread depth wears away (which is why tires are shaved for competition and track use), a tire will become more likely to tramline as it wears.

Wheels can influence tramlining as well. Installing wider tires or a "Plus Size" tire and wheel package usually requires using wheels with a different offset than the vehicle's original wheels. In some cases, the new wheels will have slightly less offset than the original and in other cases, slightly more. It all depends on the vehicle's suspension design and available wheelwell clearances. You will even find that Original Equipment manufacturers often use different wheel offsets for their different diameter tire and wheel packages.

Usually the amount of offset change is kept to a minimum and vehicle tracking remains relatively unchanged. However if the offset is significantly different, it will alter the way the road forces are transmitted through the tire and wheel to the suspension. Therefore, large changes in wheel offset will increase the likelihood of tramlining.

Suspension bushings, ball joints and shock absorber mounts have a direct influence on tramlining as well. As miles are driven and the years go by, the suspension's wear parts will deteriorate as they age. This often happens so slowly that it isn't very noticeable. Over time the ever-increasing suspension wear permits play that eventually allows the tire to be directed by the irregularities of the road rather than be controlled by the suspension.

Imagine a worn suspension that allows a front wheel and tire to swing between the recommended 1/16-inch of toe-in and 1/16-inch of toe-out when it encounters a rut in the road. This 1/8-inch difference in the direction that the tire is pointed will result in the vehicle tramlining. Replace the worn part to remove the play and you will significantly reduce or remove the tramlining. Many drivers with higher mileage cars have reported that replacing worn suspension components has eliminated tramlining and made the car drive like it is new again...which I guess it essentially is!

Service Adjustments
Using higher tire pressures than recommended by the vehicle manufacturer for your driving conditions will unnecessarily stiffen the tire and make it even more willing to cause tramlining. If you are running higher tire pressures than necessary, simply dropping the tire pressures to those recommended by the vehicle manufacturer will help reduce tramlining.

Alignment settings can be key as well. The "camber" and "toe" settings both play a role in vehicle stability and the propensity for tramlining. Extreme positive or negative camber settings will make a vehicle more sensitive, especially when only one wheel encounters a longitudinal rut and/or groove at a time. Even if all the tires are "aimed" straight ahead when the vehicle is in motion, a tire that is "cambered" wants to turn. This is the result of the "camber thrust" generated by a leaning tire (it is also part of the explanation of how motorcycles turn). A vehicle suspension using lots of negative camber for competition or the track will experience more tramlining on the street.

Additionally, the drivers who use additional toe-out settings to encourage their vehicle to turn into corners better also encourage tramlining because the extra toe-out will reduce vehicle stability in a straight line.

In the case of the competition driver who uses non-factory alignment settings, the amount of tramlining that is acceptable has to be left up to the driver. For only street-driven cars, getting them aligned with negative camber and toe settings within the factory's specifications is an important first step.

Roads
On a multi-lane highway, usually the left lane offers the smoothest road surface because it sees the least amount of heavy truck traffic. Unfortunately, on many interstate highways, it's not legal to continually drive there (pull right except to pass). While the center lane can be almost as smooth on a six-lane highway, there can be exceptions. For example, in the case of I-94 between Chicago and Milwaukee, you will find that when the road was widened from two to three lanes, the center of the new center lane is on top of the original junction between the earlier two lanes. This means that vehicles traveling in the new center lane have their right hand tires on the original right hand truck lane and their left side tires are on the original left lane. This can cause an uncomfortable feeling for miles. Usually the right hand lanes are the least smooth because they are rutted by heavy truck traffic. When you drive in those lanes, or drive across them to exit the highway, it's possible that you'll find your vehicle may feel like it wants to follow the truck ruts and has a mind of its own.

Driving Style
If you experience tramlining, the main thing you want to remember is to keep both hands on the steering wheel in the proper "9- and 3-o'clock" positions. This will help you make the precise steering inputs that will help keep your vehicle on course. You sacrifice precise control if you drive with one hand on the wheel or both hands in the wrong place.
 

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This car and my previous car both do the same thing with summer tires on them. Just have to pay attention a bit more when driving, more so the ruts, bumps, and grooves in the road. Your summer tire will follow those grooves and pull you all over. We have some pretty bad roads around here so I constantly fight my steering wheel.

Sucks you already dropped the money on the PS4S. This issue could be reduced some or all together with some all season tires or softer sidewall tires like Bevo mentioned in the article.

Don't quote me b/c I haven't done it myself yet but that is my plan when these stock tires wear out. That would have been any week now before C19 but now I think I have quite some time before I'll need new rubbers

Cheers and stay safe/healthy everyone!
 

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This car and my previous car both do the same thing with summer tires on them. Just have to pay attention a bit more when driving, more so the ruts, bumps, and grooves in the road. Your summer tire will follow those grooves and pull you all over. We have some pretty bad roads around here so I constantly fight my steering wheel.

Sucks you already dropped the money on the PS4S. This issue could be reduced some or all together with some all season tires or softer sidewall tires like Bevo mentioned in the article.

Don't quote me b/c I haven't done it myself yet but that is my plan when these stock tires wear out. That would have been any week now before C19 but now I think I have quite some time before I'll need new rubbers

Cheers and stay safe/healthy everyone!
My dunpel tires were worn from the side, it was completely soft and yet the car was swinging terribly.

The issue is, in Montreal, the roads are the worst you can ever see due to snow and salt, I mean you can't even avoid potholes or bumps some times so this makes it hard to enjoy the car and the tires in the summer, at least won't be able to speed.

Man I was waiting so bad to get my wheelies for the summer, now I want the winter to come back.

Curious, is it all the cars tho? My friend has a mustang with 18"goodyear summer and he never faced that, maybe that's because the Q60 is AWD?
 

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Curious, is it all the cars tho? My friend has a mustang with 18"goodyear summer and he never faced that, maybe that's because the Q60 is AWD?
It's a combination of tire width, sidewall height, tread design and compound. If the road has a lot of imperfections and your tires have very little flex, those imperfections are going to be transmitted into the steering. The more responsive a car is to the driver's steering input, the more it's going to be affected by road surface. Design a car with sluggish steering with high profile tires and it won't be affected by the road.
 

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It's a combination of tire width, sidewall height, tread design and compound. If the road has a lot of imperfections and your tires have very little flex, those imperfections are going to be transmitted into the steering. The more responsive a car is to the driver's steering input, the more it's going to be affected by road surface. Design a car with sluggish steering with high profile tires and it won't be affected by the road.
Curious, can switching from standard to sport steering reduce this a bit? Or the opposite?

I'm talking about the car settings here.
 

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Curious, can switching from standard to sport steering reduce this a bit? Or the opposite?

I'm talking about the car settings here.
That's not going to change the characteristics of the tires, wheels, and road surface. That's where this issue originates. You can try it, but I doubt it will have much effect.
 
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Curious, can switching from standard to sport steering reduce this a bit? Or the opposite?
I have noticed I get a stiffer feel when in Sport+ mode. So mostly drive there all the time. In the ATL, we have lots of pot holes, instead of Trap City, I’m starting to call it Pothole City.
 

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Sounds similar to an issue I had. It ended up being the rack and pinion assembly. It was shot to ****. Had the whole thing replaced under warranty.

I knew there was a problem when I turned the steering wheel I could feel a click which was feedback from the R&P misbehaving. Dealer inspections are free. Take it to a dealer and have them check the R&P.
 

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Sounds similar to an issue I had. It ended up being the rack and pinion assembly. It was shot to ****. Had the whole thing replaced under warranty.

I knew there was a problem when I turned the steering wheel I could feel a click which was feedback from the R&P misbehaving. Dealer inspections are free. Take it to a dealer and have them check the R&P.
Would do that yes, I would put back the 18" winter tires and test driving the car and see.

The car is really dangerous, I can't speed at all as it swings right and left randomly, not only from the front but also from the back.

On high speeds, it's really hard to control the car. On highways, I always tend to stay far from cars in the next lane as I can't guarantee a sudden swing.

Really terrible experience and feeling.

And by the way, it swings to left and right WITHOUT having the steering wheel turned! Soif you hold tight the steering wheel to guarantee it stays in center, trust me, it would still go left and right randomly.
 

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Would do that yes, I would put back the 18" winter tires and test driving the car and see.

The car is really dangerous, I can't speed at all as it swings right and left randomly, not only from the front but also from the back.

On high speeds, it's really hard to control the car. On highways, I always tend to stay far from cars in the next lane as I can't guarantee a sudden swing.

Really terrible experience and feeling.

And by the way, it swings to left and right WITHOUT having the steering wheel turned! Soif you hold tight the steering wheel to guarantee it stays in center, trust me, it would still go left and right randomly.
Try putting those fancy winter wheels back on and see how it rides
 

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I have stock 19 inch wheels and Dunlop SP 255/40R19
I find they don't do well when hitting uneven roads, seem to shift a little, makes me wary of going too fast into corners
My Jetta with 17 inch and 35 profile seems to hold the road better, albeit at slower speeds :)
 

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I have stock 19 inch wheels and Dunlop SP 255/40R19
I find they don't do well when hitting uneven roads, seem to shift a little, makes me wary of going too fast into corners
My Jetta with 17 inch and 35 profile seems to hold the road better, albeit at slower speeds :)
Beside the fact that the dunlop tires sucks and are tooooo noisy, they do better than the Michelin Sports 4S regarding tramlining.
Don't do my mistake by getting high performance summer tires, you will find your car swinging non stop
 

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Im an Infiniti Dealer technician and my opinion on this is that it would be worth taking to the dealership and expressing your concern. Depending on which steering system youre equipped with, this may be a legitimate issue. With the DAST steering system, if there is an issue with the system it can cause what you are describing. But without driving it or inspecting im just guessing. Thats why my suggestion is to have an Infiniti professional inspect it. Most tire shops and after market shops dont have the experience or expertise required to fully inspect these new steering systems. Just my opinion
 
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