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Following the lead of others on the Q50/60 Forums, I installed the Pride rear diff brace with sleeve tonight. No instructions are included with the kit, but there are a couple of YT videos available showing the install. It's really straight-forward and not difficult, but it took some time and thought to get things fitted properly. To make room for the install I unmounted the fuel vapor block and the small square heat shield that hangs down vertically from the trunk.

Because the sleeve is a very tight fit in the hole of the sub-frame member, I used a Dremel with a sanding drum bit to chamfer one end of the brace sleeve and also lightly coated it with some assembly lube so that it would slide into the sub-frame easier. Using the included long bolt with some spacers as a guide, I hammered the sleeve through the cross member until it made contact with the other side - it doesn't actually go through the second hole. As the sleeve went further into the hole I had to add more spacers so that the long bolt wouldn't "bottom out" against the diff cover - see pic. You can also use a handful of 3/8" id washers instead of the spacers to do the same job.

After inserting the sleeve I removed the bottom three bolts of the diff cover, then mounted the Pride brace at the top and tightened the included nyloc nut just slightly. The three holes at the bottom of the brace lined up with the three bolt holes at the bottom of the diff, but there was a 1/8" gap between the brace and the diff cover, similar to what I saw on the YT video. I could have just tightened the three nuts to pull the brace flush against the diff cover, but I was concerned that doing so would stress the weld joints of the brace, so I added a couple of 5/16" washers to each bolt to fill in the gap. After snugging up the bottom three bolts, I then used a torque wrench to tighten the top bolt and nut, then the three bottom bolts. Lastly, I remounted the fuel vapor block and the small heat shield and the install was completed.

I took the car out for a short spin around the neighborhood to check for odd behavior or noises but didn't notice anything unusual. I also did one launch from a standstill to check the effects of the brace, and it seems the rear end of my Q is digging in a little harder and staying in the lane a little straighter. But the tires still break loose very easily (my Q is RWD only) and the only remedy for that is using drag slicks (not an option for me) or an LSD.

In summary, for the modest cost of the brace and an hour of wrench time, I think the Pride brace is a worthwhile mod. How long it holds up remains to be seen, but as I'm a conservative driver I expect this brace will last quite a while. Here are some pics - thanks for reading, and Happy Holidays !!

I used the brace bolt as a guide so that the sleeve would go through the frame member as straight as possible. As the sleeve went further through the frame the bolt would get closer to the diff cover which required me to add spacers or washers after every 1/2 " or so.
Automotive tire Rim Gas Automotive wheel system Auto part


Here is the sleeve hammered pretty much flush with the entry hole.
Cylinder Household hardware Auto part Font Wood


And here is the other side of the frame member. Sleeve stops on the inside of the hole and does not extend through the hole.
Tire Automotive tire Bumper Automotive lighting Rim


Brace completely installed with nuts properly torqued : 32 ft-lb for the single top bolt and 22 ft-lb for the bottom three bolts.
Automotive lighting Automotive tire Motor vehicle Hood Automotive exhaust
 

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But the tires still break loose very easily (my Q is RWD only) and the only remedy for that is using drag slicks (not an option for me) or an LSD.
Thanks for the review on the Pride brace.

I would highly recommend an LSD, especially for RWD. I've had a Quaife LSD installed on my '17 Q60S AWD for the last month and I really like it. Much more grunt off the line, and really picks up the power off corner exit. It does create more power induced understeer in turns, but it's worth the trade-off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Did they engineer something to prevent the bolt from sliding around now? I was gonna get one but put off after watching speed cultures review
A "sleeve" (aka long bushing/spacer) is included with the brace which takes up most of the install time as shown in my post. See here: Pride Brace.
 
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Following the lead of others on the Q50/60 Forums, I installed the Pride rear diff brace with sleeve tonight. No instructions are included with the kit, but there are a couple of YT videos available showing the install. It's really straight-forward and not difficult, but it took some time and thought to get things fitted properly. To make room for the install I unmounted the fuel vapor block and the small square heat shield that hangs down vertically from the trunk.

Because the sleeve is a very tight fit in the hole of the sub-frame member, I used a Dremel with a sanding drum bit to chamfer one end of the brace sleeve and also lightly coated it with some assembly lube so that it would slide into the sub-frame easier. Using the included long bolt with some spacers as a guide, I hammered the sleeve through the cross member until it made contact with the other side - it doesn't actually go through the second hole. As the sleeve went further into the hole I had to add more spacers so that the long bolt wouldn't "bottom out" against the diff cover - see pic. You can also use a handful of 3/8" id washers instead of the spacers to do the same job.

After inserting the sleeve I removed the bottom three bolts of the diff cover, then mounted the Pride brace at the top and tightened the included nyloc nut just slightly. The three holes at the bottom of the brace lined up with the three bolt holes at the bottom of the diff, but there was a 1/8" gap between the brace and the diff cover, similar to what I saw on the YT video. I could have just tightened the three nuts to pull the brace flush against the diff cover, but I was concerned that doing so would stress the weld joints of the brace, so I added a couple of 5/16" washers to each bolt to fill in the gap. After snugging up the bottom three bolts, I then used a torque wrench to tighten the top bolt and nut, then the three bottom bolts. Lastly, I remounted the fuel vapor block and the small heat shield and the install was completed.

I took the car out for a short spin around the neighborhood to check for odd behavior or noises but didn't notice anything unusual. I also did one launch from a standstill to check the effects of the brace, and it seems the rear end of my Q is digging in a little harder and staying in the lane a little straighter. But the tires still break loose very easily (my Q is RWD only) and the only remedy for that is using drag slicks (not an option for me) or an LSD.

In summary, for the modest cost of the brace and an hour of wrench time, I think the Pride brace is a worthwhile mod. How long it holds up remains to be seen, but as I'm a conservative driver I expect this brace will last quite a while. Here are some pics - thanks for reading, and Happy Holidays !!

I used the brace bolt as a guide so that the sleeve would go through the frame member as straight as possible. As the sleeve went further through the frame the bolt would get closer to the diff cover which required me to add spacers or washers after every 1/2 " or so.
View attachment 25239

Here is the sleeve hammered pretty much flush with the entry hole.
View attachment 25240

And here is the other side of the frame member. Sleeve stops on the inside of the hole and does not extend through the hole.
View attachment 25241

Brace completely installed with nuts properly torqued : 32 ft-lb for the single top bolt and 22 ft-lb for the bottom three bolts.
View attachment 25242
I will be doing the same install sometime next week and this is valuable info, thank you.

In additionto this, I also bought the transmission mount.

Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
 

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I will be doing the same install sometime next week and this is valuable info, thank you.

In addition to this, I also bought the transmission mount.
Huh, same here, except I'll add Z1 subframe bushings to the list.
 

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Huh, same here, except I'll add Z1 subframe bushings to the list.
Nice! I already have the Z1 SF bushings.

I'm still debating if I should add the solid rear diff bushings. Install only the 4-bushings and leave the OEM sub bushing...maybe the nvh is tolerable for highway cruising.

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Nice! I already have the Z1 SF bushings.

I'm still debating if I should add the solid rear diff bushings.
The solid rear diff bushings require removal of the rear diff to put it in a press, so that the old bushings can be pressed- out, and the new ones pressed-in. Too much hassle for very minimal gain and likely loss of ride comfort.

I'm likely going to skip the "D" spacer - I'm hesitant to lop-off the OEM mushroom top on the forward subframe bushings.
 
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The solid rear diff bushings require removal of the rear diff to put it in a press, so that the old bushings can be pressed- out, and the new ones pressed-in. Too much hassle for very minimal gain and likely loss of ride comfort.

I'm likely going to skip the "D" spacer - I'm hesitant to lop-off the OEM mushroom top on the forward subframe bushings.
[
I just got my Z1 SF Bushings.
 

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I just got my Z1 SF Bushings.
Installed three (3) of the four (4) SF Collars yesterday. I removed the aero panels that block access to the front subframe mounts and frame braces. I used my transmission jack to support the rear diff, disconnected the RSB end links at the RSB ends, loosened all four mounts, which included removing the front bolted (2) frame braces, and without removing the exhaust, I dropped was able to slip-in the "C" collar on the upper front, and it dropped right in. The "A" and "B" collars pressed-in from the bottom, as well. I used a small amount of lube for all installation points.

For the AWD, on the upper rear mount, there is a flat rubber washer/isolator that could be removed, and then a rubber sleeve that wraps around the main mount post bushing which prevents the "D" collar from getting installed, as the rubber bushing diameter is larger than the opening in the "D" collar. This rubber bushing would need to be cut, and then split to remove, as best as I can tell. This is all poorly explained in the Z1 directions. I chose to leave the upper rear mount alone, as I wanted some isolation from the driveline.

Overall, I can feel the shifts a little more, and my hope is I reduced some of the slop or wind-up by using these spacer, but at least I'm not getting any excessive vibration through the seat.
 
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Installed three (3) of the four (4) SF Collars yesterday. I removed the aero panels that block access to the front subframe mounts and frame braces. I used my transmission jack to support the rear diff, disconnected the RSB end links at the RSB ends, loosened all four mounts, which included removing the front bolted (2) frame braces, and without removing the exhaust, I dropped was able to slip-in the "C" collar on the upper front, and it dropped right in. The "A" and "B" collars pressed-in from the bottom, as well. I used a small amount of lube for all installation points.

For the AWD, on the upper rear mount, there is a flat rubber washer/isolator that could be removed, and then a rubber sleeve that wraps around the main mount post bushing which prevents the "D" collar from getting installed, as the rubber bushing diameter is larger than the opening in the "D" collar. This rubber bushing would need to be cut, and then split to remove, as best as I can tell. This is all poorly explained in the Z1 directions. I chose to leave the upper rear mount alone, as I wanted some isolation from the driveline.

Overall, I can feel the shifts a little more, and my hope is I reduced some of the slop or wind-up by using these spacer, but at least I'm not getting any excessive vibration through the seat.
Will attempt these tonight or tomorrow :). Thanks for the detailed instructions. Will grab you a pic later on under the dash.
 
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